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Flood in Pakistan

Over three million children are at risk, over a thousand have been killed, and over two hundred and eighty thousand homes have been destroyed.

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) issued a statement on Wednesday indicating that more than three million children in Pakistan are in danger as a direct result of the devastation caused by the floods. The statement was issued in Islamabad.
A statement in the release said, “More than three million children need humanitarian help and are more likely to get sick from waterborne diseases, drown, or go hungry because of the worst floods in Pakistan’s recent history.”

The intense monsoon rains began around the middle of July 2022, and since then, they have had a devastating effect across the country, impacting 33 million people in 116 districts, with 66 districts being the most severely affected.

According to the statement, “UNICEF is working with government and non-government partners to respond to the immediate needs of children and families in impacted regions.” (Unicef is working with government and non-government partners.)

A state of emergency was proclaimed in Pakistan one week ago, and the country has since made a request for aid from other nations and international organizations in light of the devastating floods.

In the statement, UNICEF stated that the heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan this year have affected 33 million people, including nearly 16 million children. These monsoon rains have produced disastrous storms, floods, and landslides across the country.

“There have been more than 1,100 fatalities, including more than 350 children, and an additional 1,600 people have been wounded. More than 287,000 homes have been wiped down entirely, and another 662,000 are damaged beyond repair. The banks of many major rivers have been breached, and dams have spilled, which has resulted in the destruction of houses, farms, and essential infrastructure like roads, bridges, schools, hospitals, and other public health services, according to the statement.

In addition, according to UNICEF, it is projected that thirty percent of the water systems in the regions that were touched by the floods have been destroyed, and there have already been reports of instances of diarrhoea and other water-borne diseases, as well as respiratory infections and skin problems.

According to the release, “They impact communities that are highly vulnerable. Forty percent of children already suffer from stunting, which is caused by chronic undernutrition, before the floods came.” It is anticipated that the already precarious humanitarian situation will continue to deteriorate over the next few days and weeks as heavy rains continue in areas that are currently under water.

In light of the fact that it is anticipated that the flooding will continue to get worse over the next few days, which will have an even greater impact on humanitarian efforts and public health, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) immediate priorities are to rapidly expand access to essential health services for the population that has been affected by the flooding; to strengthen and expand disease surveillance, outbreak prevention and control; and to ensure a well-coordinated response at national and subnational levels, including the participation of all relevant partners.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Government of Pakistan is leading the national response, which includes declaring a state of emergency in affected areas, establishing control rooms and medical camps at the provincial and district levels, organizing air evacuation operations, and conducting health awareness sessions for people who are now at an increased risk of contracting waterborne and vector-borne diseases, as well as other infectious diseases such as COVID-19.

Images taken before and after the floods in Pakistan by NASA show the devastation caused by the floods.

Flood in Pakistan
Photo by Nasa

The way the Indus River overflows and causes flooding is shown by a large area of dark blue.

Images taken before and after the floods in Pakistan by NASA illustrate the devastation caused by the floods. A large portion of the land is seen in a dark blue color, indicating that the Indus river has overflowed and flooded the area.

Islamabad: Satellite images show that the overflowing Indus River in Sindh Province has resulted in the creation of a massive inland lake that is 100 kilometers wide. This lake was caused by the deadly flooding in Pakistan.
According to CNN, fresh photos obtained on August 28 from NASA’s MODIS satellite sensor reveal how severe rain and an overflowing Indus River have combined to inundate a large portion of Sindh province in the south.

The Indus River has overflowed its banks and flooded an area that is approximately 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide, transforming what was once agricultural land into a massive inland lake. A large area of dark blue in the middle of the picture shows this effect.

It is a shocking change from the photo that was taken by the same satellite on the same date last year, which shows the river and its tributaries contained in what appear to be small and narrow bands by comparison, highlighting the extent of the damage in one of the country’s areas that has been hit the hardest.

A “monsoon on steroids,” as officials from the United Nations have described it, has brought the heaviest rainfall in living memory, along with flooding that has killed 1,162 people, injured 3,554, and affected 33 million people, according to CNN. Swaths of the country are now underwater as a result of this “monsoon on steroids.”

Even though there is still one month left in the monsoon season, the Pakistan Meteorological Department reports that this year’s monsoon has already produced the most rainfall in the country since records began being kept in 1961.

The provinces of Sindh and Balochistan have both seen rainfall that is five hundred percent more than normal, which has flooded entire villages and fields, destroyed buildings, and wiped out crops.

Even though the area is expected to have mostly dry weather in the next few days, experts say it will take days for the water to go down.

Sherry Rehman, Pakistan’s minister for climate change, said on Sunday that some parts of the country “look like a miniature ocean,” and she added, “By the time this is over, we could very well have a quarter or a third of Pakistan under water.”

 Satellite photographs demonstrate that the overflowing Indus River in Sindh Province has resulted in the formation of a gigantic inland lake that is one hundred kilometers wide. This lake can be seen from Islamabad.

 

According to CNN, fresh photos obtained on August 28 from NASA’s MODIS satellite sensor reveal how severe rain and an overflowing Indus River have combined to inundate a large portion of Sindh province in the south.

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